Plum, Gage & Damson

Plums were one of the first fruits to be farmed.  The cultivated plum ‘Prunus domestica’ is thought to be a cross between the cherry plum and the sloe.  Now there are over 300 varieties of plums and greengages.  The plum is usually oval in shape, the gage round. Plum trees are not as robust as apple or pear trees, or as long-lived.  They need a sheltered site that escapes spring frosts, as they flower early.  They prefer a well drained moisture retentive and slightly acidic soil.

PRUNING  – Plums are best grown as a bush or pyramid.  Stone fruits should always be pruned during the growing season (May to September) to reduce the risk of silver leaf infection.

POLLINATION – Some plums are self-fertile, if they are not, choose varieties within the same pollination group if possible.

ROOTSTOCKS – Most of our plums, gages and damsons are grown on St. Julien A rootstocks, which will eventually give a tree of 3.5-4.5m(12-15ft) or a pyramid of 2.4-2.7m(8-9ft).

Plums when ripe will not store well.  If picked before ripening with stalk attached fruits can be kept in a cool place for 2/3 weeks.

We have available:

Bush, 1/2 Standard and Standard trees

Fan trained trees

Please see our Fruit catalogue for further details.  Please contact us for current price and availability and to place an order.

 

Burbank’s Giant

Pollination group 1. Self-fertile. Large long oval fruit – red with darker purple and various russet dots and greenish yellow flesh.  Fertile and regularly bearing heavy crops. Ripens early to mid September.

Cambridge Gage SF(Part)

Pollination group 3. Small yellow-green fruits with excellent flavour and very juicy. Useful as either a dessert or culinary gage and ripening in late August/early September. A fair cropper.

Coe’s Golden Drop

Pollination group 2. Self-fertile. Excellent large yellow dessert plum, ripening second half of September. Very juicy, very sweet, apricot-like flavour.

Czar SF

Pollination group 2. A heavy cropping blue plum. Good acid flavour and very juicy. Named after the Czar of Russia who was visiting at the time it was introduced. Ripens early August.  Can also be eaten fresh once ripe.

Early Transparent

Pollination group 3.  A connoisseur’s fruit of the highest quality, deliciously sweet and richly flavoured. Pale apricot-yellow.  Skin is see-through and when ripe if the sun is behind it you can see right through to the stone, hence the name.  Ready for eating late August.

Marjorie’s Seedling

Pollination group 3.  Self-fertile. A vigorous, heavy cropping blue plum with good flavour. Introduced in 1912.  Round to oval, large purplish with blue bloom.  Ripens late September.

Mirabelle de Nancy SF

Pollination group 3.  A cultivated form of the wild Cherry Plum or Myrobalan.  Profuse white blossom leads to golden yellow fruits July to August.  Golden yellow flesh, rich and sweet – fairly dry, good for eating and cooking.

 

Old English SF

Pollination group 3.  Self-fertile. A connoisseur’s fruit of the highest quality, deliciously sweet and richly flavoured. Pale green .  Ready for eating late August.

 

Opal SF

Pollination group 2.  An early heavy cropping dessert plum, with excellent flavoured medium sized fruits – yellow with a purplish black flush, with a distinct gage like texture. Fruits ready late July. BRISTOL 1925

Oullins Golden Gage 

Pollination group 4. Self-fertile. Not a true gage but a dual-purpose gage/plum. Large, round, fairly sweet fruit. Skin is yellow with green dots, the flesh is pale yellow and transparent, ideal for preserving if picked early. Flowers late, therefore ideal for frosty places. Ripens mid-August.

Victoria SF

Pollination group 2.  Introduced in 1840, this plum was found as a chance seedling in Alderton, Sussex. A heavy cropper, this plum is one of the most popular. Fruit is oval, red of excellent flavour, sweet and very juicy, but also useful for cooking when under ripe. Ready for eating late August/early

DAMSONS

PRUNING  – Stone fruits should always be pruned during the growing season (May to September) to reduce the risk of silver leaf infection.

POLLINATION – Some damsons are self-fertile, if they are not, choose varieties within the same pollination group if possible.

ROOTSTOCKS – Our damsons are grown on St. Julien A rootstocks, which will eventually give a tree of 3.5-4.5m(12-15ft) or a pyramid of 2.4-2.7m(8-9ft).

We have available:

1/2 Standard trees

Farleigh’s Prolific

Pollination group 2. A small tree with small blue-black fruits of a fine rich flavour when cooked, bearing enormous crops in suitable conditions. Although partially self-fertile it is readily pollinated by other plums. Ready for picking mid-September.

Merryweather SF

Pollination group 3. A large, dark damson with juicy, acidic fruits ideal for culinary use, particularly suitable for freezing and bottling. Ripens in September.

 

Our Fruit Tree Product Range

Apple Trees

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Cherry Trees

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Pear Trees

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Medlar Trees

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Quince Trees

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Fig Trees

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Mulberries

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Plum, Gage & Damson

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Nuts

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